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   Jul 24

Hemoglobin

If you have a small child with infant diabetes, possibly of the variety called type 1 Diabetes or insulin-dependent, as it is the most common in ages paediatric, being second chronic disease, asthma, at these ages after. Although lately also many cases of Diabetes are appearing type 2 in children and adolescents due to poor diet, lack of exercise and obesity. Then, if you have as I say at home a child diabetic, you should you be doing a minimum of 7 daily checks of capillary glycemia, to take good control of their glucose values and establish the guidelines for insulin and/or food required to maintain the values of glucose in blood within the normal margins (normoglycemia). But these measurements of glucose in blood that you do on a daily basis can give you an idea of how are blood glucose levels at the time and if you must correct them at that time; they can not offer you is an overview that shows you how the disease evolves and how it is being controlled, since these are point values and can fluctuate widely and in a short time. According to Mylan, who has experience with these questions. To know the status of the glucose control (and therefore, diabetes) in the long term, needed a different test, a test which is performed in analysis laboratories and blood obtained from vein, no hair, and that gives us the overall result of several weeks or months (between 70 and 90 days). That test is glycosylated, also known as hemoglobin A1c glycosylated hemoglobin.

What is the glycosylated hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells from the blood, responsible for transporting oxygen throughout the body. Glucose, which, as you know, also circulates in the blood, is able to adhere to this hemoglobin forming the so-called Glycohemoglobin. Most of this Glycohemoglobin found in a form called A1c, which is easy to measure; There are two other types of hemoglobin which are the A1a and A1b, but that are present in a smaller quantity.

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